Found project: Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont


    Project : Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont

    Architect : n/a

    Completion: 1586

    Locality : Paris

    Country : France

    Building style : Gothic

    Project on the map (green arrow)

    Description :

    Jean-Paul Marat was one of the more extreme voices of the French Revolution and he became a vigorous defender of the sans-culottes. For the two months leading up to the downfall of the Girondin faction in June, he was one of the three most important men in France, alongside Georges Danton and Maximilien Robespierre. The fall of the Girondins on the 31st of May was a triumph for Marat. But it was his last. The skin disease he had contracted in the subterranean haunts was rapidly closing his life; he could only ease his pain by sitting in a warm bath, where he wrote his journal. Sitting thus on the 13th of July he heard in the evening a young woman begging to be admitted to see him, saying that she brought news from Caen, where the escaped Girondins were trying to rouse Normandy. He ordered her to be admitted, asked her the names of the deputies then at Caen, and, after writing their names, said, “They shall be soon guillotined”, when the young girl, whose name was Charlotte Corday, stabbed him to the heart. Jean-Paul Marat is buried in the church’s cemetery of St. Etienne-du-Mont.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Paul_Marat (June 14, 2011).
    http://www.nndb.com/people/630/000092354/ (June 14, 2011).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-%C3%89tienne-du-Mont (June 14, 2011).


    Amédée Boinet, archivist and librarian at the library of Saint Genevieve, while describing the church of Saint Etienne, and particularly its rood screen quotes a certain Hivert, who in 1740 addressed to the churchwardens of Saint Etienne a note in which he strives to prove that it is urgent to cut down the rood screen. According to this honourable citizen, the rood screen, although very well sculptured, cannot at all be preserved or preferred to the beauty of the choir. A choir he says would turn the church into a bigger and more majestic one, and by then making it become one of the most beautiful churches of Paris. At present, in M. Hivert’s opinion this rood screen that looks like a bridge is no longer bearable to viewing. Boinet, continues in agreeing that it is certain that, as a rule the rood screens prevent to embrace at one glance the whole interior of the structures of which they somewhat break lines, but asks are they not often wonders of sculpture and ornamentation? The advices of the sieur Hivert were fortunately not taken in consideration.

    Amédée Boinet, Les Edifices Réligieux: Moyen-Age. Renaissance, Ed. H. Laurens, 1910, Paris, p. 167. Série: les richesses d’art de la ville de Paris.

    Ed. and trans. Adzhoa Makkonen



    Images 1-4 of 4
    Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
    Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
    Image © Heikki Hanka

    Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
    Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
    Image © Heikki Hanka

    Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
    Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
    Image © Heikki Hanka

    Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
    Église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
    Image © Heikki Hanka