Found project: Views of Abydos


    Project : Views of Abydos

    Architect : n/a

    Locality : Abydos

    Country : Egypt

    Building style :

    Project on the map (green arrow)

    Description :

    “Abydos, the cult centre of Osiris, god of the dead, was regarded as the holiest of Egyptian towns in Pharaonic times. All ancient Egyptians tried to make the pilgrimage to the town during their lifetime or hoped to be buried here. Many tombs were painted with scenes of the deceased making the posthumous journey to Abydos. Tradition had it that Osiris – or at least his head – was laid to rest here after he was murdered by his brother Seth and his mutilated body strewn over the country.

    Abydos was once a vast walled town with several ancient cemeteries, lakes and temples, including the important Temple of Osiris. Today, almost all that can be seen is the stunning 19th-Dynasty Cenotaph Temple of Seti I. Built during Seti I’s reign between 1294–1279 BC, it is one of the most intact temples of Egypt.”

    Eyewitness Travel – Egypt, DK, 2007, p. 177.

    Ed. Katriina Puputti

    “Abydos [is] one of the principal sites of Egypt, containing many of the most important tombs, temples and town remains of the period from the 1st Dynasty to the New Kingdom. At least 12 royal cult complexes are attested to either archaeologically or from other sources, dating from the 12th to the 26th Dynasty (‘houses of millions of years’, places were the king was re-united with Osiris)…
    The cemetery of the kings of the 1st and 2nd Dynasties is at Umm el-Ga’ab, in the desert west to the temple of Sety I. Various researchers have questioned whether the royal tombs at Abydos are ‘real’, seeing them merely as cenotaphs [duplicate tombs] of the kings who were actually buried at Saqqara…
    Several kings constructed an Osisris tomb [which architectural motif stems from the myth according to which parts of the body of Osiris, scattered over the whole country, lay buried under a mound planted with trees] at Abydos either following the tradition of earlier royal tombs, or in order to participate in the resurrection of Osiris by means of false burial. Two examples have been found to date: the monumental cult complex erected by King Senwosret III and the cenotaph of Ahmose in the form of a pyramid-like cult structure…
    Within the enclosure of Kom el-Sultan are the remains of a town, which dates from Naqada III [approximately from 3200 to 3000 BC (1)] onwards, as well as the scant remains of a temple to Osiris-Khentyimentyu (2).” (3)

    (1)Shaw, Ian, The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt. Oxford University Press, ed (2000). p. 479
    (2) “Compared with later periods, little is known in inscriptional terms about the temples and cults of Abydos in the Old Kingdom. Although the site later became the cult center of Osiris, the Egyptian god of death par excellence, the earliest appearances of his name are in the fifth dynasty, and the pre-eminent deity for much of the Old Kingdom was Khentyimentyu ‘foremost of the Westerners’, a god of the dead subsumed into Osiris in the course of the period.” Texts from the pyramid age, Nigel Strudwick, Ronald J. Leprohon, Brill, 2005, p. 98
    (3)Arnorld, Dieter, The Encyclopedia of Ancient Egyptian Architecture, trans. Sabine H. Gardiner and Helen Strudwick, ed. Nigel and Helen Strudwick, I.B. Tauris, London, 2003, pp. 3-5,168

    Ed. Adzhoa Makkonen



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    Views of Abydos
    Views of Abydos
    Image © Aurasmaa, Anne

    Views of Abydos
    Views of Abydos
    Image © Aurasmaa, Anne

    Views of Abydos
    Views of Abydos
    Image © Aurasmaa, Anne

    Views of Abydos
    Views of Abydos
    Image © Aurasmaa, Anne

    Views of Abydos
    Views of Abydos
    Image © Aurasmaa, Anne

    Views of Abydos
    Views of Abydos
    Image © Aurasmaa, Anne

    Views of Abydos
    Views of Abydos
    Image © Aurasmaa, Anne

    Views of Abydos
    Views of Abydos
    Image © Aurasmaa, Anne